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Dreams and Time - Psychologist World

On Dreams and Time

by Frank Martin DiMeglio. Submitted July 20th, 2008


The dream is demonstrative of (and critical for) our ability to grow in (and with) time and to become other than we are. Accordingly, dreams involve a fundamental integration and spreading of being and experience at the mid-range of feeling between thought and sense; as the self represents, forms, and experiences a comprehensive approximation of experience in general. Critically, the fundamental integration and spreading of being and experience during dreams is essential to the continuity and extensiveness of being and experience (including thought) in time.


Dreams are necessarily an emotional experience. Consistent with this, there is a proportionate reduction of both thought and feeling during dreams. (This is consistent with experiences of flying and falling in dreams.) Emotion approximates to the mid-range of feeling between thought and sense in keeping with the range of feeling that is experienced by the body. The central role of desire in relation to experience becomes clear; for the comprehensiveness and consistency of both intention and concern are central to our consciousness, life, and growth. (Desire consists of both intention and concern, thereby including interest as well.)

 

The perception and meaning of experience are functions of the comprehensiveness and consistency of intention and concern in regard to experience in general. This is inseparable from our very freedom and the extensiveness of experience and thought. The comprehensiveness and consistency of intention and concern in relation to experience in general involves: language; superior, elevated, and sustained desire; wonder; and expanded consciousness (and thought). That the self represents, forms, and experiences a comprehensive approximation of experience in general is the great revelation of dreams. Indeed, consciousness and language involve the ability to represent, form, and experience comprehensive approximations of experience in general; and this includes art and music as well. Becoming "one with the music" is linked to the fact that emotion that is comprehensive and balanced advances consciousness.


Dreams involve a sense of relative familiarity with the experience therein. In keeping with this, dreams involve a fundamental integration and spreading of being and experience, thereby increasing the capacity for memory and understanding; for there is an increase in the extensiveness of experience during dreams, and also a relative reduction in [the totality of] experience while dreaming. Therefore, dreams simultaneously improve upon both memory and understanding in conjunction with new experiences/thoughts. (This effect is clearly evident in the works of genius, and also with the past/present/future extensiveness and superior predictability regarding the thoughts of genius.) It is for these reasons that the dream neither involves what has happened (the past) nor what will happen (the future); but, dreams have essential, substantial, and significant bearing regarding what can happen (in relation to past, present, and future experience). Again, the fundamental integration and spreading of being and experience during dreams is essential to the continuity and extensiveness of being and experience (and thought) in time. Similarly, dreams and memory integrate experience; and both add to the extensiveness of experience as well, while involving a [relative] reduction in the totality of experience.

 

Dreams are an emotional experience that occur during the one third of our lives that we spend sleeping, because emotion is one part (or one third) of feeling, emotion, and thought. Consistent with this, both feeling and thought are proportionately reduced in the dream. Thoughts and emotions are differentiated feelings. Dreams are essential for thoughtful and emotional balance, integration, comprehensiveness, consistency, and resiliency. Indeed, emotion that is comprehensive and balanced advances consciousness. If the self did not represent, form, and experience a comprehensive approximation of experience in general, we would be incapable of growth and of becoming other than we are.

 

About the Author

 

Frank Martin DiMeglio was born in Newport, Rhode Island. He has had considerable success in managing, understanding, and overcoming both depression and anxiety, and he has been very actively engaged in studying philosophy and psychology for the past 8 years. Mr. DiMeglio has a Bachelor of Science degree (cum laude) in Geography and Environmental Planning from Towson University (1987). He currently lives in Middle River, Maryland, and he is working on his second book.

 

Also by Frank Martin DiMeglio

 

 


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